2020 Keynotes

MDOCS Forum: Co-Creation and Its Discontents, June 4th – 7th

Featuring Keynote screening and presentation by Another Kind of Girl Collective

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Members of Another Kind Of Girl Collective in production.
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Members of Another Kind Of Girl Collective in production.

Another Kind of Girl Collective (AKGC) is a media arts collective through which young women living in displaced, migrant or transitory communities around the world connect and co-create. It is a space across geographies where they can express their stories, collaborate, and develop a collective process and platform through which their artistic work can be experienced by one another, and on a global level.

Another Kind of Girl Collective’s roots grew from our first media arts workshop of young women from Syria, in a netted picnic shelter inside Jordan’s Za’atari Refugee Camp. Nearly six years later, we expanded our collective through a first-ever, ongoing collaboration with young female artists from another displaced community—indigenous Shipibo teens from Cantagallo, Lima, Peru.

AKGC facilitators are beginning a new collaboration with Honduran refugee teenage women in New Orleans, in partnership with community organizers in the Village de l’Est community and their organization, NOLA Village.

AKGC members believe that the stories they tell, as well as the process of telling these stories, can be transformative; and that bringing their stories out of isolation, to connect with those of other displaced and refugee communities around the world, is a way of building solidarity, understanding and collective power among young women. Their vision is to collectively determine how their own stories are told.

Current film (in post-production, title pending):

Through video letters between displaced communities on opposite sides of the globe, four young women document their transition from childhood to motherhood. Karoli and Christy, indigenous Shipibo teens living in Lima, Peru, embark on a friendship and collaboration with Khaldiya and Marah, Syrian teens living as refugees in Jordan—forming bonds of support, understanding and solidarity across great distance and cultural difference. Shot entirely by the four young directors, the film documents and juxtaposes their diverse struggles and joys amid shared transitions and uncertainties. They push one another to resist the cultural norms and narratives imposed on them and help each other find and reflect new definitions of home in the face of massive uncertainty.

Collective Bios:

Christy Cauper Silvano is an 18-year old Shipibo teen living in Lima, Peru who co-directed the film Un Pedacito de la Selva en la Ciudad (2015), which premiered in a community screening at the Túpac Cultural Center in Barranco, Lima, then screened at Mi Primer Festival in Lima in 2017, where it won an audience award. Her photographs were also featured in the group exhibit “Fotos por el Cambio” (“Photography for Change”) at the Peruvian North American Cultural Institute (ICPNA), organized by a photography workshop based at the U.S. Embassy in Lima. She is skilled in her culture’s traditional embroidery, which she learned from her mother, is an avid photographer, and is eager to continue making films.Christy (Peru)

 Christy Cauper Silvano is an 18-year old Shipibo teen living in Lima, Peru who co-directed the film Un Pedacito de la Selva en la Ciudad (2015), which premiered in a community screening at the Túpac Cultural Center in Barranco, Lima, then screened at Mi Primer Festival in Lima in 2017, where it won an audience award. Her photographs were also featured in the group exhibit “Fotos por el Cambio” (“Photography for Change”) at the Peruvian North American Cultural Institute (ICPNA), organized by a photography workshop based at the U.S. Embassy in Lima. She is skilled in her culture’s traditional embroidery, which she learned from her mother, is an avid photographer, and is eager to continue making films.

EB (USA/Peru)

 Elizabeth (EB) Landesberg is a filmmaker, multimedia artist and educator. In 2013, she received an MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts from Duke University, where she then taught in the Program in the Arts of the Moving Image for three years. She is currently co-director of the Lewis Hine Documentary Fellows Program, as well as co-director of Another Kind of Girl Collective, an expanding global media collective for young women living in displaced communities. She was also a 2019 Visiting Fellow at the Skidmore Storytellers’ Institute.

EB’s documentary practice seeks to put different lives and communities in conversation—with one another, and with herself—and to make different forms of power more visible. Over the past ten years, it has centered on themes of labor, memory, loss, humor, culture and the sacred. She has also collaborated with young people through educational programs, media workshops and community organizations throughout the Americas. As a 2014-15 Documentary Fellow through the Duke University Sanford School of Public Policy’s Felsman Fellowship program, she spent ten months in Lima, Perú facilitating documentary workshops with teenagers, through which they investigated and made pieces about their own communities, families and cultures. In all of her work, she is committed to including marginalized voices in processes of illuminating inequality and initiating social change; to media-making as a tool of cultural affirmation and self-determination; and to redistributing resources and access to dispossessed communities.

Karoli (Peru)

Karoli Bautista Pizarro is a 17-year old Shipibo filmmaker and performer living in Lima, Peru. She is the director of the film Escúchame Cantar (2016), which played at the North Carolina Latin American Film Festival, and Alice Fest, as well as in numerous educational and community settings. She co-directed Un Pedacito de la Selva en la Ciudad (2015), which screened at Mi Primer Festival, in Lima, Peru, and won an audience award. She has also participated in many traditional Shipibo dances and performances in her community and throughout Lima.

Khaldiya (Jordan)

Khaldiya Ghneim is a 21-year-old Syrian filmmaker living as a refugee in Jordan, whose filming brings us through the most personal spaces of Za’atari Refugee Camp with her inquisitive, poetic eye. She is the director of the short film Another Kind of Girl (2015), which premiered at Sundance, then went on to play at Cannes, SXSW, and many other festivals. A version of the film was also featured on the New York Times Op-docs. Among many other awards, she won a production grant for best new emerging filmmaker at Kassel Documentary Film Festival, earning her a camera and computer.

Lali (Peru)

Isabel Madueño is an independent producer with more than fifteen years of experience in film production. She graduated with a B.A. in Audiovisual Communication from the University of Lima, with a specialization in audiovisual production and cinema. Isabel co-founded and was general producer of DOCUPERU for more than a decade (2015-2017): a Peruvian organization that promotes, produces and encourages decentralized documentary processes and products as tools of empowerment and expression, with an educational, intercultural and collective development approach. During this time, she produced more than 200 short documentaries made in participatory workshops throughout Perú. She has also worked with prominent Peruvian directors such as Ernesto Cabellos and with renowned local production houses such as TamboFilms, where she is a permanent producer doing research and production for international television stations such as CBS, Nat Geo, and more.

Her most recent projects as a producer include: the non-fiction feature film “El Dorado XXI” directed by Portuguese director Salomé Lamas, which had its world premiere at the 2016 Berlinale (Forum); and “By the Name of Tania” (2018) the latest non-fiction feature film by Belgian-Peruvian director Mary Jiménez, which premiered at the 2019 Berlinale (Generation Plus), and for which Isabel was production manager in Peru, and assistant director.

She is a co-founder of Travesía Films (2017), a filmmaking house that seeks to get closer to new modes of audiovisual storytelling. At the end of 2017, she created the annual training workshop “Taller Travesía,” having the outstanding director Mary Jiménez as a mentor for 11 projects that will be finished by the end of 2019.

She has been also working for the last year as a co-producer and co-facilitator on the Peruvian-Syrian-Jordanian-American project “Another Kind of girl” with the support of Sundance Institute and John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Short Documentary Grant for Native and Indigenous Storytellers (a partnership with the Guardian’s Documentary Platform), and Creative Capital.

Currently, she is producing the transmedia documentary “Cordillera Blanca” by director Alexander Luna, the experimental documentary “La Memoria de las Mariposas” by Tatiana Fuentes Sadowski and the last feature documentary film by the Peruvian filmmaker Marianela Vega “Paulo”.

Laura (USA/Jordan)

 Laura Doggett is a community artist and educator whose work incorporates video, audio, writing, performance, and the visual arts with community actions to engage girls and young women from displaced and marginalized communities around the world, from the Appalachian mountains of Kentucky and West Virginia to the immigrant communities and inner cities of New York City and Washington, D.C., to Syrian refugee camps in Jordan.

After practicing her art for 20 years, Doggett graduated from Duke University with an MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts. Doggett recently completed the Lewis Hine Fellowship, doing documentary arts work with young women in the Bronx aging out of the foster care system. Through a J. Kirk Felsman Fellowship, Doggett began working with Syrian girls living as refugees in Jordan, which inspired them to begin the Another Kind of Girl Collective. In the summer of 2018, they began the expansion of their collective through a collaboration with young female artists from another displaced community—indigenous Shipibo teens from Cantagallo, Lima, Peru, co-directing a film across borders, which documents their transition from childhood to motherhood, forming bonds of support, understanding and solidarity across great distance and cultural difference.

Marah (Jordan)

 Marah Al-Khatib is the 18-year-old director of the short film Children (2015), which won numerous awards at film festivals, and will soon be held in a permanent museum collection in London. Marah has rigorously and adventurously continued to document children, families and Za’atari’s oldest residents in the camp. More recently, she created media for the Thompson Reuters Association as well as completing a 360 film.

Tasneem (Jordan)

 Tasneem Alkhatib is a passionate animator-educator and native of Jordan, with roots and active involvement with Amman’s Circassion community. She has co-facilitated AKGC Jordan workshops for five years. She received an Animation Production MA from Bournemouth University in 2016. She is a professor at the Applied Science Private University’s College of Art and Design in Amman.